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Sheeran Family History

Sheeran Family History

 


Origin Displayed: Irish

The surname Sheeran is derived from Mac Searthuin, which means son of Searthun. The personal name Searthun is equivalent to Geoffrey.

Spelling variations of this family name include: Shearing, Sheering, Sheeran, Sharron, Sherren, Sherran, Shirran, Sheeran, Sheerin, O'Shearing, O'Sheering, O'Sheeran, O'Sharron, O'Sherren, O'Sherran, O'Shirran, O'Sheeran, O'Shearing and many more.

First found in county Donegal where they were anciently seated, some say before the Anglo Norman invasion of Ireland by Strongbow in 1172.

Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: Daniel, Edward, Hugh, Patrick and Thomas Sheerin who landed in Philadelphia Pa. between 1804 and 1864; Edward and John Sheering landed in Philadelphia in 1867.

Motto Translated: Truth conquers.

 

 

 









Donegal County:

 

 

Pronounced As: donigôl, dun- , county (1991 pop. 128,117), 1,865 sq mi (4,830 sq km), N Republic of Ireland, on the Atlantic Ocean. The county seat is Lifford. The extremely irregular coastline extends from Lough Foyle on the north to Donegal Bay on the west and is deeply indented by Lough Swilly. Arranmore Island is the largest of the coastal islands. The west is rugged and hilly. There are two mountain ranges: the Derryveagh Mts. in the northwest and the Blue Stack Mts. in the west central region. Errigal (2,466 ft/752 m) is the tallest peak. The chief rivers are the Foyle, the Erne, and the Finn; lakes are plentiful. Donegal has no rail service. Although agriculture is the leading industry, only one third of the land is suitable for cultivation. The valleys of the Finn and the Foyle are the most intensively cultivated areas. Oats and potatoes are the chief crops. Fishing and tourism are also important industries. In the south is the center of the Donegal cloth industry that produces tweeds and handmade woolens. There are several small shirt factories. Newer industries include carpet, fishing net, and synthetic fiber manufacturing. Gaelic is still spoken in the highland region. In ancient times the kingdom of Tyrconnell, Donegal was not organized as a county until the reign of Elizabeth I of England.

 

Towns & Villages - Annagry, Ardara, Ballintra, Ballybofey, Ballyliffin, Ballyshannon, Bunbeg, Buncrana, Bundoran, Burtonport, Carndonagh, Carrick, Carrickfinn, Carrigans, Carrigart, Castlefinn, Churchill, Clonmany, Convoy, Cranford, Creeslough, Crolly, Culdaff, Derrybeg, Donegal Town, Doocharry, Downings, Dunfanaghy, Dungloe, Dunkineely, Dunlewy, Fahan, Falcarragh, Fintown, Frosses, Glencolumbkille, Glenties, Gortahork, Greencastle, Inver, Kerrykeel, Kilcar, Killybegs, Kilmacrenan, Kincasslagh, Kindrum, Letterkenny, Lifford, Magheraroarty, Malin, Malinmore, Milford, Mountcharles, Moville, Muff, Narin/Portnoo, Pettigo, Portnablagh, Portsalon, Ramelton, Raphoe, Rathmullan, Redcastle, Rosapenna, Rosbeg, St Johnston, Stranorlar

 


Celtic Crosses from Donegal:

Carandonagh – Co. Donegal
 Circa 650 A.D.
Named after St. Patrick, this cross is the oldest free standing high cross, and was once part of an isolated hermitage. Ringless and lightly carved from red sandstone it stands 2.5 metres in height.













Fahan Mura Cross

The 7th century Celtic interlace cross from the Fahan churchyard in County Donegal, Ireland, is thought to be one of the earliest versions of the famous Celtic sun cross designs in Ireland.  On the opposite side of the cross is the only Greek inscription found from early Christian Ireland reading "Glory and honour to the Father, Son and Holy Spirit".  A monastery was founded here by St. Colmcille in the 7th century which survived for 500 years.










Sheeran Distribution in Ireland from 1848-1864

 

 

The table below shows the number of sheeran households in each county in the Primary Valuation property survey of 1848-64.   Click on a county name for a breakdown of the number of households by parish (paying).

Antrim

1

Armagh

1

Cavan

2

Cork

1

Donegal

17

Down

4

Dublin

5

Dublin city

1

Fermanagh

1

Kilkenny

3

Laois

2

Leitrim

17

Limerick

7

Limerick city

2

Longford

12

Louth

5

Mayo

21

Meath

12

Monaghan

1

Offaly

12

Roscommon

32

Sligo

3

Tyrone

4

Waterford

1

Westmeath

21

 

 

 

 

 

SURNAME TOTAL Shearan 8 Shearin 10 Sheeran 188 Sheeren 3 Sheerin 116 Sheeron 4 Sheran 7 Sherin 15

 

SURNAME DICTIONARY/ SLOINNTE NA h-EIREANN

Ó Síoráin Sheeran: líonmhar: Lár na Tíre, Connachta thoir. Bhí siad i gCorcaigh sa 16 céad ach ina dhiaidh sin is i Leath Chuinn a gheibhtear iad. Cuireann Mac Giolla Iasachta i Tír Chonaill-Fear Manach mar chlann iad agus tugann sé Ó Sírín ar an ndream i gCorcaigh. An bhrí: ní léir - "síor" sa chiall "seasamhach", b'fhéidir. SI. Ó Síoráin rare: scattered. Ir.Lang. See Sheeran. Sheeran numerous: all areas except Munster but especially Midlands and E Connacht. The Irish is Ó Sírín (SI); Ó Síoráin (SGA). MacLysacht believes they were a sept of West Ulster who spread south. For the Cork sept of same name, see also Syron, apparently another synonym. MIF.
Name History

 

From O'SHEERIN (Ireland), from the Counties of Donegal, Fermanagh and Liex. This name was first recorded in the County of Donegal. Some say before the Angle Norman invasion of Ireland by Strongbow. One source is quoted as saying that "the great Gaelic family of Sherren" emerged in later years in Donegal and by the 15th century had branched to Fermanagh and south to Leix, and even to the mainland of England in Dorset and Somerset. They were registered in Ireland as a Clann with its own Chief.

 

In England their settlement in Dorset brought them in touch with the Newfoundland shipping company who fished the greenbanks. From there they migrated to the Green Bay, Newfoundland, where many of the fishing boats wintered. Notably among the family at this time was Sheeran of Donegal. The ancient family motto for this name is "vincit veritas". Descendents of this family in Canada spell their name 'Sherrin or Sherin'

 

Family Tartan

 

Distribution of the Sheeran Family in the 1920’s

 


 


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